BORN THIS WAY

“Telling people that you are ‘born this way’, when referring to your sexual orientation, is counter-productive to the LGBT movement”

Hear me out, that is all I ask.
Part of my course at university entails a reading of a myriad of different theories: Marxism, Structuralism, Gender, and so forth. This week, the focus was on ‘queer theory’. Essentially, queer theory proposes the idea that heteronormativity subtly dictates our societal conventions and ‘norms’, and that homosexuality is perceived as the opposite of this. It seeks to expose the oppression, conscious or unconscious, that the LGBT community has faced in the past, and how it is still existent today.
Back to the point of this article: the notion of ‘being born this way’, referring to one’s sexuality, was raised and discussed. Is it helpful? Personally, I don’t think it is.
Some in the LGBT community seek to explain their sexual orientation by saying that there were ‘born that way’, suggesting some intrinsic, and therefore biological, reason for their sexual preference.
The issue, for me, is the fact that it appears as an obscure justification for one’s sexual attraction. It shouldn’t need justification.
How many times has someone murdered, or performed inhumane acts, and had it explained by some psychotic malfunction?
He/She committed such acts because they were ‘born that way’ and it isn’t their fault – they have something wrong with them. Please, judge send them to be reformed, show some mercy. Or so the script goes.
A similarity can be shown here: in both cases, the hypothetical psychopath, and the homosexual, are born a certain way, and their actions aren’t they fault.
This similarity should never, ever occur. But, sadly it does. Being homosexual isn’t a fault, and it isn’t wrong. However, arguing that you were ‘born that way’ suggests otherwise; indeed, it implies one feels guilt and still feels as though it is wrong.
So, to summarise, I feel as though telling people that you are ‘born this way’, when referring to your sexual orientation, is counter-productive to the LGBT movement. It, as explained above, implies that the individual feels as though they have to plead their case – they don’t, they’ve done nothing wrong, but this explanation, intrinsically, proposes otherwise.
As inferred above, I’ve never really explored theory in such detail, so I’m going to make mistakes – forgive any ignorance I’ve demonstrated.
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